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Intelligence: All That Matters

Intelligence: All That Matters PDF Author: Stuart Ritchie
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 144479180X
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 160

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Book Description
There is a strange disconnect between the scientific consensus and the public mind on intelligence testing. Just mention IQ testing in polite company, and you'll sternly be informed that IQ tests don't measure anything "real", and only reflect how good you are at doing IQ tests; that they ignore important traits like "emotional intelligence" and "multiple intelligences"; and that those who are interested in IQ testing must be elitists, or maybe something more sinister. Yet the scientific evidence is clear: IQ tests are extraordinarily useful. IQ scores are related to a huge variety of important life outcomes like educational success, income, and even life expectancy, and biological studies have shown they are genetically influenced and linked to measures of the brain. Studies of intelligence and IQ are regularly published in the world's top scientific journals. This book will offer an entertaining introduction to the state of the art in intelligence and IQ, and will show how we have arrived at what we know from a century's research. It will engage head-on with many of the criticisms of IQ testing by describing the latest high-quality scientific research, but will not be a simple point-by-point rebuttal: it will make a positive case for IQ research, focusing on the potential benefits for society that a better understanding of intelligence can bring.

Intelligence: All That Matters

Intelligence: All That Matters PDF Author: Stuart Ritchie
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 144479180X
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 160

View

Book Description
There is a strange disconnect between the scientific consensus and the public mind on intelligence testing. Just mention IQ testing in polite company, and you'll sternly be informed that IQ tests don't measure anything "real", and only reflect how good you are at doing IQ tests; that they ignore important traits like "emotional intelligence" and "multiple intelligences"; and that those who are interested in IQ testing must be elitists, or maybe something more sinister. Yet the scientific evidence is clear: IQ tests are extraordinarily useful. IQ scores are related to a huge variety of important life outcomes like educational success, income, and even life expectancy, and biological studies have shown they are genetically influenced and linked to measures of the brain. Studies of intelligence and IQ are regularly published in the world's top scientific journals. This book will offer an entertaining introduction to the state of the art in intelligence and IQ, and will show how we have arrived at what we know from a century's research. It will engage head-on with many of the criticisms of IQ testing by describing the latest high-quality scientific research, but will not be a simple point-by-point rebuttal: it will make a positive case for IQ research, focusing on the potential benefits for society that a better understanding of intelligence can bring.

Extreme Intelligence

Extreme Intelligence PDF Author: Sonja Falck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429875916
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 218

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Book Description
Extreme intelligence is strongly correlated with the highest of human achievement, but also, paradoxically, with higher relationship conflict, career difficulty, mental illness, and high-IQ crime. Increased intelligence does not necessarily increase success; it should be considered as a minority special need that requires nurturing. This book explores the social development and predicaments of those who possess extreme intelligence, and the consequent personal and professional implications for them. It uniquely integrates insights and knowledge from the research fields of intelligence, giftedness, genius, and expertise with those from depth psychology, emphasising the importance of finding ways to talk effectively about extreme intelligence, and how it can better be supported and embraced. The author supports her arguments throughout, reviewing the academic literature alongside representations of genius in history, fiction, and the media, and draws on her own first-hand research interviews and consulting work with multinational high-IQ adults. This book is essential reading for anyone supporting or working with the highly gifted, as well as those researching or interested by the field of intelligence.

The Psychology of Intelligence

The Psychology of Intelligence PDF Author: Sonja Falck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000196909
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 140

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Book Description
What fascinates us about intelligence? How does intelligence impact our daily lives? Why do we sometimes fear intelligence? Human intelligence is a vital resource, yet the study of it is pervaded by neglect and misconceptions. The Psychology of Intelligence helps make sense of the contradictory social attitudes and practices in relation to intelligence that we have seen over the decades, from the idea that it drove eugenicist policies and actions in the past, to our current backlash against "experts" and critical thinking. Showing how our approach to intelligence impacts our everyday lives in educational, occupational, medical, and legal settings, the book asks if it is possible to lift the taboo and move beyond the prejudices surrounding intelligence. Challenging popular assumptions, The Psychology of Intelligence encourages us to face intelligence in ourselves and others as an important fact of life that we can all benefit from embracing more openly.

Something Doesn’t Add Up

Something Doesn’t Add Up PDF Author: Paul Goodwin
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1782835490
Category : Mathematics
Languages : en
Pages : 226

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Book Description
Some people fear and mistrust numbers. Others want to use them for everything. After a long career as a statistician, Paul Goodwin has learned the hard way that the ones who want to use them for everything are a very good reason for the rest of us to fear and mistrust them. Something Doesn't Add Up is a fieldguide to the numbers that rule our world, even though they don't make sense. Wry, witty and humane, Goodwin explains mathematical subtleties so painlessly that you hardly need to think about numbers at all. He demonstrates how statistics that are meant to make life simpler often make it simpler than it actually is, but also reveals some of the ways we really can use maths to make better decisions. Enter the world of fitness tracking, the history of IQ testing, China's social credit system, Effective Altruism, and learn how someone should have noticed that Harold Shipman was killing his patients years before they actually did. In the right hands, maths is a useful tool. It's just a pity there are so many of the wrong hands about.

The Nature of Human Intelligence

The Nature of Human Intelligence PDF Author: Robert J. Sternberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316819566
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
The study of human intelligence features many points of consensus, but there are also many different perspectives. In this unique book Robert J. Sternberg invites the nineteen most highly cited psychological scientists in the leading textbooks on human intelligence to share their research programs and findings. Each chapter answers a standardized set of questions on the measurement, investigation, and development of intelligence - and the outcome represents a wide range of substantive and methodological emphases including psychometric, cognitive, expertise-based, developmental, neuropsychological, genetic, cultural, systems, and group-difference approaches. This is an exciting and valuable course book for upper-level students to learn from the originators of the key contemporary ideas in intelligence research about how they think about their work and about the field.

The Elements of Education for Teachers

The Elements of Education for Teachers PDF Author: Austin Volz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135158779X
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 102

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Book Description
What makes some teachers more effective than others? What pedagogies and practices are fads and which are backed with quality evidence? Which teaching strategies give teachers the biggest learning bang for their buck? The authors have surveyed the research literature and carefully curated 50 elements of effective teaching—elements such as direct instruction, executive functions, metacognition, motivation, and scaffolding—to answer such questions and demystify the secrets of master teachers. Designed specifically for clarity and ease of use, this book is perfect for both new and experienced educators. Each element uses a consistent architecture: a simple definition, concise overview of the research, practical Dos and Don’ts for the classroom, and a select quote to inspire reflection. The Elements of Education for Teachers is an essential addition to any teacher’s library and important reading for teachers’ professional development.

Blueprint, with a new afterword

Blueprint, with a new afterword PDF Author: Robert Plomin
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262537982
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 292

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Book Description
A top behavioral geneticist makes the case that DNA inherited from our parents at the moment of conception can predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses. In Blueprint, behavioral geneticist Robert Plomin describes how the DNA revolution has made DNA personal by giving us the power to predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses from birth. A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent lifelong sources of our psychological individuality—the blueprint that makes us who we are. Plomin reports that genetics explains more about the psychological differences among people than all other factors combined. Nature, not nurture, is what makes us who we are. Plomin explores the implications of these findings, drawing some provocative conclusions—among them that parenting styles don't really affect children's outcomes once genetics is taken into effect. This book offers readers a unique insider's view of the exciting synergies that came from combining genetics and psychology. The paperback edition has a new afterword by the author.

The Politics of Warfare

The Politics of Warfare PDF Author: Stephen J. Cimbala
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271042079
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description


Blueprint

Blueprint PDF Author: Robert Plomin
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262350610
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 280

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Book Description
A top behavioral geneticist makes the case that DNA inherited from our parents at the moment of conception can predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses. In Blueprint, behavioral geneticist Robert Plomin describes how the DNA revolution has made DNA personal by giving us the power to predict our psychological strengths and weaknesses from birth. A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent life-long sources of our psychological individuality—the blueprint that makes us who we are. This, says Plomin, is a game changer. Plomin has been working on these issues for almost fifty years, conducting longitudinal studies of twins and adoptees. He reports that genetics explains more of the psychological differences among people than all other factors combined. Genetics accounts for fifty percent of psychological differences—not just mental health and school achievement but all psychological traits, from personality to intellectual abilities. Nature, not nurture is what makes us who we are. Plomin explores the implications of this, drawing some provocative conclusions—among them that parenting styles don't really affect children's outcomes once genetics is taken into effect. Neither tiger mothers nor attachment parenting affects children's ability to get into Harvard. After describing why DNA matters, Plomin explains what DNA does, offering readers a unique insider's view of the exciting synergies that came from combining genetics and psychology.

The SAGE Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood Studies

The SAGE Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood Studies PDF Author: Daniel Thomas Cook
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1529721695
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 1888

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Book Description
The SAGE Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood Studies navigates our understanding of the historical, political, social and cultural dimensions of childhood. Transdisciplinary and transnational in content and scope, the Encyclopedia both reflects and enables the wide range of approaches, fields and understandings that have been brought to bear on the ever-transforming problem of the “child” over the last four decades This four-volume encyclopedia covers a wide range of themes and topics, including: Social Constructions of Childhood Children’s Rights Politics/Representations/Geographies Child-specific Research Methods Histories of Childhood/Transnational Childhoods Sociology/Anthropology of Childhood Theories and Theorists Key Concepts This interdisciplinary encyclopedia will be of interest to students and researchers in: Childhood Studies Sociology/Anthropology Psychology/Education Social Welfare Cultural Studies/Gender Studies/Disabilty Studies