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A Lucky Child

A Lucky Child PDF Author: Thomas Buergenthal
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1847651844
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 242

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Book Description
Thomas Buergenthal is unique. Liberated from the death camps of Auschwitz at the age of eleven, in adulthood he became a judge at the International Court in The Hague. In his honest and heartfelt memoirs, he tells the story of his extraordinary journey - from the horrors of Nazism to an investigation of modern day genocide. Aged ten Thomas Buergenthal arrived at Auschwitz after surviving the Ghetto of Kielce and two labour camps, and was soon separated from his parents. Using his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck, he managed to survive until he was liberated from Sachsenhausen in 1945. After experiencing the turmoil of Europe's post-war years - from the Battle of Berlin, to a Jewish orphanage in Poland - Buergenthal went to America in the 1950s at the age of seventeen. He eventually became one of the world's leading experts on international law and human rights. His story of survival and his determination to use law and justice to prevent further genocide is an epic and inspirational journey through twentieth century history. His book is both a special historical document and a great literary achievement, comparable only to Primo Levi's masterpieces.

A Lucky Child

A Lucky Child PDF Author: Thomas Buergenthal
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1847651844
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 242

View

Book Description
Thomas Buergenthal is unique. Liberated from the death camps of Auschwitz at the age of eleven, in adulthood he became a judge at the International Court in The Hague. In his honest and heartfelt memoirs, he tells the story of his extraordinary journey - from the horrors of Nazism to an investigation of modern day genocide. Aged ten Thomas Buergenthal arrived at Auschwitz after surviving the Ghetto of Kielce and two labour camps, and was soon separated from his parents. Using his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck, he managed to survive until he was liberated from Sachsenhausen in 1945. After experiencing the turmoil of Europe's post-war years - from the Battle of Berlin, to a Jewish orphanage in Poland - Buergenthal went to America in the 1950s at the age of seventeen. He eventually became one of the world's leading experts on international law and human rights. His story of survival and his determination to use law and justice to prevent further genocide is an epic and inspirational journey through twentieth century history. His book is both a special historical document and a great literary achievement, comparable only to Primo Levi's masterpieces.

Children of the Holocaust

Children of the Holocaust PDF Author: Stephanie Fitzgerald
Publisher: Capstone
ISBN: 0756543908
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
Languages : en
Pages : 34

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Book Description
Presents the accounts of Jewish children living in Europe during the Holocaust and describes the methods by which some of them survived, including the Kindertransport and remaining in hiding.

A Natural History of Human Morality

A Natural History of Human Morality PDF Author: Michael Tomasello
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674915879
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 195

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Book Description
Michael Tomasello offers the most detailed account to date of the evolution of human moral psychology. Based on experimental data comparing great apes and human children, he reconstructs two key evolutionary steps whereby early humans gradually became an ultra-cooperative and, eventually, a moral species capable of acting as a plural agent “we”.

Corruptible

Corruptible PDF Author: Brian Klaas
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1529338115
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 208

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Book Description
'Illuminating . . . reveals why some people and systems are more likely to be corrupted by power than others' - Adam Grant 'Passionate, insightful, and occasionally jaw-dropping . . . Corruptible sets out the story of the intoxicating lure of power-and how it has shaped the modern world' - Peter Frankopan 'A brilliant exploration' - Dan Snow 'Klaas is the rarest of finds: a political scientist who can also tell great stories. He mixes memorable anecdotes with stern analysis to tackle one of the biggest questions of all: do we have to be ruled by bad people?' - Peter Pomerantsev Does power corrupt or are corrupt people drawn to power? Are tyrants the products of bad systems or are they just bad people? And why do we give power to awful people? In Corruptible, professor of global politics Brian Klaas draws on over 500 interviews with some of the world's top leaders - from the noblest to the dirtiest - including presidents, war criminals, cult leaders, terrorists, psychopaths, and dictators to reveal the most surprising workings of power: how children can predict who is going to win an election based just on the faces of politicians; why narcissists make more money; what makes a certain species of bee more corrupt than others; whether a thirst for power is a genetic condition; and why being the second in command is in fact the smartest choice. From scans of psychopathic brains, to the effects of power on monkey drug use, Klaas weaves cutting-edge research with astonishing encounters (including a ski lesson with the former viceroy of Iraq, tea with a former UK prime minister, and breakfast with Madagascar's yogurt kingpin president). Written by the creator of the award-winning Power Corrupts podcast, Corruptible challenges our basic assumptions about power, from the board room to the war room, and provides a roadmap for getting better leaders at every level.

Child Development in Evolutionary Perspective

Child Development in Evolutionary Perspective PDF Author: David F. Bjorklund
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108853862
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages :

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Book Description
Natural selection has operated as strongly or more so on the early stages of the lifespan as on adulthood. One evolved feature of human childhood is high levels of behavioral, cognitive, and neural plasticity, permitting children to adapt to a wide range of physical and social environments. Taking an evolutionary perspective on infancy and childhood provides a better understanding of contemporary human development, predicting and understanding adult behavior, and explaining how changes in the early development of our ancestors produced contemporary Homo sapiens.

Transnationalism and the Asian American Heroine

Transnationalism and the Asian American Heroine PDF Author: Lan Dong
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786462086
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 239

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Book Description
This collection examines transnational Asian American women characters in various fictional narratives. It analyzes how certain heroines who are culturally rooted in Asian regions have been transformed and re-imagined in America, playing significant roles in Asian American literary studies as well as community life. The interdisciplinary essays display refreshing perspectives in Asian American literary studies and transnational feminism from four continents.

Becoming Human

Becoming Human PDF Author: Michael Tomasello
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674988639
Category : Psychology
Languages : en
Pages : 360

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Book Description
Winner of the William James Book Award “Magisterial...Makes an impressive argument that most distinctly human traits are established early in childhood and that the general chronology in which these traits appear can at least—and at last—be identified.” —Wall Street Journal “Theoretically daring and experimentally ingenious, Becoming Human squarely tackles the abiding question of what makes us human.” —Susan Gelman, University of Michigan Virtually all theories of how humans have become such a distinctive species focus on evolution. Becoming Human proposes a complementary theory of human uniqueness, focused on development. Building on the seminal ideas of Vygotsky, it explains how those things that make us most human are constructed during the first years of a child’s life. In this groundbreaking work, Michael Tomasello draws from three decades of experimental research with chimpanzees, bonobos, and children to propose a new framework for psychological growth between birth and seven years of age. He identifies eight pathways that differentiate humans from their primate relatives: social cognition, communication, cultural learning, cooperative thinking, collaboration, prosociality, social norms, and moral identity. In each of these, great apes possess rudimentary abilities, but the maturation of humans’ evolved capacities for shared intentionality transform these abilities into uniquely human cognition and sociality.

The Possibilities of Charting Modern Life

The Possibilities of Charting Modern Life PDF Author: Sigurd Erixon
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 1483148084
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 184

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Book Description
Wenner–Gren Center International Symposium Series, Volume 13: The Possibilities of Charting Modern Life presents the proceedings of the symposium on Anthropological Research on the Present, held in Stockholm, Sweden, on March 7–11, 1967. This book discusses the greater dependence of culture on central control and influences from outside. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the possibilities of applying the same methods for the study of the present as have been applied in the ethnology concentrated upon history. This text then clarifies the value of certain functional concepts in the light of the field material from the Tuareg culture. Other chapters consider the concept of applied ethnology, which is not historically oriented. This book discusses as well the gradual shifting of the concept of sex-role from its proper import of expression for the individual's biological statuses. This book is a valuable resource for social anthropologists.

Reducing Educational Disadvantage: A Strategic Approach in the Early Years

Reducing Educational Disadvantage: A Strategic Approach in the Early Years PDF Author: Penny Tassoni
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472933001
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 208

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Book Description
In the early years children's cognitive development is largely shaped by their home environment, but research shows that on average, children who are entitled to free school meals start primary school with lower scores in reading and mathematics than their peers. As an early years practitioner, you can influence these children's learning within your setting, and help them to achieve the same levels as their more affluent peers. That's what this book aims to do - help you to narrow the gap! This unique book shows you how to provide a 'safety net' for children who are most at risk of underachievement. You will be taught about the different factors that positively impact upon children's learning (including adult interaction and literacy and mathematical experiences) and how they link to good practice within the EYFS. From tips for creating a rich, and diverse play environment for them to enjoy, to suggestions on how to carefully guide activities and experiences, this book will help you to establish a strong, long term education programme. You will be amazed at the impact you will have upon these children simply by making small changes to your practice and planning, and you might even increase your setting's chance of gaining an 'outstanding' Ofsted grade!

Contemporary Anti-Natalism

Contemporary Anti-Natalism PDF Author: Thaddeus Metz
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1000786277
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 220

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Book Description
Given the pain, discomfort, anxiety, heartbreak, and boredom that most humans experience in their lives, is it morally permissible to create them? Some philosophers lately have answered ‘No’, contending that it is wrong to create a new human life when one could avoid doing so, because it would be bad for the one created. This view is known as ‘anti-natalism’. Some contributors to this volume argue that anti-natalism is true because: agents have a prima facie duty to prevent suffering; it is immoral to violate another’s right not to be harmed without having consented to it; and it is a serious wrong to exploit the weakness of a poorly off being to become a biological parent. Others here argue against anti-natalism on the ground, for instance, that many of our lives are not so bad and in fact are quite good and that the logic of anti-natalism absurdly entails pro-mortalism, the view that we should kill off as many people as possible. This book explores these and related issues concerning the evaluative question of how to judge the worthwhileness of lives and the normative question of what basic duties entail for the creation of new lives. Excepting one, all the chapters in this book were originally published in the South African Journal of Philosophy.